Wordtravels

Wordtravels

Arthur's Seat

The tallest of the seven hills that form Holyrood Park at 822 feet (250m), Arthur's Seat is actually an extinct volcano that overlooks the city of Edinburgh. There are the remains of an Iron Age hill fort, with several grassy plateaus that make for pleasant stopping points on the way up. Described by poet Robert Louis Stevenson as 'a hill for magnitude, a mountain in virtue of its bold design', Arthur's Seat is popular for hikes, and the view from the top over Edinburgh and the surrounding countryside is well worth the climb. There are many different walking trails and the hill can be climbed from almost any direction, though the easiest and most popular route is from the east. The climb is not difficult but does get steep at the end so sensible shoes are recommended. The unfit can drive half way up the hill before beginning their walk. There are many ideas for how the hill got its name, among them the famous legend of King Arthur and his half-sister Morgan Le Fay; the hill is sometimes suggested as a possible site for Camelot, but the suggestion is seldom taken seriously. Traditionally, the young women of Edinburgh wash their faces in the dew on the slopes of Arthur's Seat every May Day to make themselves more beautiful.