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Mongolia Travel Information

The Basics

Time

Local time is GMT +8.

Electricity

Electrical current is 220 volts, 50Hz. European two-pin plugs are standard.

Language

Khalka Mongol predominately, with some Turkic and Russian

Travel Health

No particular immunisations are required for travel to Mongolia, although standard vaccinations like Hepatitus A & B, typhoid, and rabies are recommended. Travellers diarrhea is the most common complaint, and altitude sickness may be experienced in the Altai, Hangayn, or Khangai Mountains. There have been no infectious outbreaks reported in the last few years. It is advisable to only drink boiled or filtered water in Mongolia, and avoid raw and unpeeled fruits and vegetables.

Medical facilities in Mongolia are extremely limited. The designated hospital for foreigners is Hospital Number 2, located at Peace Avenue in Ulaanbaatar. Many Western medications are not available.

Safety Information

Travellers to Mongolia should not be unduly concerned about their personal safety. As in every city, exercise caution in Ulaanbaatar, especially at night, as theft has been known to occur. Watch out for pickpockets at the airport. Be careful when using public transport, or when driving yourself around Mongolia - road conditions can be poor, and visibility (especially at night) is often less than ideal.

Local Customs

The most important aspect of Mongolian social etiquette is the ideal of hospitality. Mongolians are famously welcoming of foreigners, although they expect - in return - that visitors show respect for Mongolian culture, by being enthusiastic and compliant guests. Travellers who enjoy 'roughing it' will probably find more success in Mongolia if they maintain their personal appearance - dirty clothes, long hair, and unkempt beards are generally frowned upon. Vodka-drinking is an inveterate feature of Mongolian culture, and being able to 'hold your liquor' is probably your shortest route to social acceptance. Finally, although there are some harsh standards of conduct, and high expectations placed on Mongolian women, these do not apply to foreigners.

Duty Free

Travellers to Mongolia may bring with them up to 200 cigarettes/50 cigars/250g of tobacco, one litre of vodka, two litres of wine, three litres of beer, and personal goods valued up to US$1,000. Pornographic materials and narcotics are prohibited.

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