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What to see in Wales

Attractions


The top tourist attractions in Wales include the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, one of the top performing arts venues in the UK; Cardiff Castle, a complex including Roman, Norman, medieval, and Victorian remains; St Fagan's National History Museum, arguably the best open-air museum in Europe; St David's Cathedral, which dates back to 1181 and graces a site which has held a church since the 6th century; Caernarfon Castle, in the delightful medieval town of the same name; the atmospheric Tintern Abbey, immortalised by poets like Wordsworth; Hay-on-Wye, known for its wealth of book shops and the Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts; and Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

However, despite this wealth of fascinating cultural and historical sites, Wales remains most famous among travellers for its stunning natural landscapes and attracts many people wanting walking holidays. There are many popular hiking trails in Wales, but the most celebrated is Offa's Dyke Path, which traverses the country from north to south, following a dyke constructed in the 8th century. Walking this National Trail path in its entirety takes about two weeks, but it can be broken up into short sections. Two of the best places to experience the scenic beauty of the country are Snowdonia National Park and Pembrokeshire Coast National Park.


Pembrokeshire Coast National Park

Located in the southwest corner of Wales just a short drive from Cardiff, the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park runs along a coastline riddled with rugged cliffs, superb sandy beaches, rocky…

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Snowdonia National Park

Snowdonia is Britain's second-biggest national park, after the Lake District, and the biggest in Wales, boasting rugged mountain trails through some of the tallest peaks south of the Scottish…

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Llandudno

The largest seaside resort town in Wales, Llandudno is a small city with a great deal of Victorian flavour. Nestled on a rocky coastline that was once the haunt of Viking ships, the city's…

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Cardiff Castle

Situated right in the heart of the city, Cardiff Castle is a unique complex of historical buildings incorporating a medieval castle, a Victorian Gothic mansion, and a Norman keep, which…

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Hay-on-Wye

Culture enthusiasts are urged to visit Hay-on-Wye, a charming market-town located within the boundaries of Brecon Beacons National Park. Widely referred to as the 'Town of Books', Hay-on-Wye…

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Tintern Abbey

Famous Tintern Abbey, a monastery established by William the Marshal to give thanks to God after surviving a narrow escape at sea, is one of the most inspiring and enduring tourist sights…

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Gower Peninsula

Designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty by the UK government, Gower is home to some of the most popular holiday destinations in Wales, including the resort towns of Swansea, Mumbles,…

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Aberystwyth

The tiny seaside town of Aberystwyth in the north of the country is the historical heart of Wales and the birthplace of the Welsh language, but the town also really knows how to have…

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